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The Italian Sayings You Need To Know For Travel

If you are wanting to travel to Italy in the future, I recommend learning these phrases a year in advance.  Learning these few phrases will help you find what you are looking for in a small amount of time. Traveling can be complicated especially if you do not know the countries language.

If you are wanting to travel to Italy in the future, I recommend learning these phrases a year in advance.  Learning these few phrases will help you find what you are looking for in a small amount of time. Traveling can be complicated especially if you do not know the countries language.

Reasons To Learn These Phrases

  • Riding the train or buss
  • Greeting Someone
  • Ordering food

Easy Phrases

  • I don’t speak Italian – Non parlo italiano
  • Please – Per favore
  • Thank you – Grazie
  • Goodbye – Arrivederci or Addio
  • You’re welcome – Prego
  • I’m looking for – tsher’ko
  • Good Night – Buona Notte

Vowels

  • A – Ah
  • E – Eh
  • I – EE
  • O – Oh
  • – Ooh

Days Of The Week

  • Monday – Lunedí
  • Tuesday – Martedí
  • Wednesday – Mercoledí
  • Thursday – Giovedí
  • Friday – Venerdí
  • Saturday – Sabato
  • Yesterday – Ieri
  • Today – Oggi
  • Tomorrow – Domani

Ordering Food

  • What do you recommend? – ¿Che cosa mi consiglia?
  • I would like (to order)… – Vorrei ordinare…
  • The bill please – Il conto per favore
  • Restaurant – Il ristorante
  • Breakfast – La colazione
  • Lunch – Il pranzo
  • Dinner – La cena
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1 comment

  1. Nice article. There are only a few points that stand out.

    There is a big difference between Arrivederci and Addio. The first one is, as you said, goodbye, but the second one is actually farewell. Depending on the context it is used at funerals or can be also quite offensive. It’s closer to a goodbye forever. So I wouldn’t use it in a daily conversation on vacation.

    “tsher’ko” is not an italian word. You probably mean the spoken pronunciation of “cerco”. It might be a good to clarify that in order to avoid confusion.

    Another thing I noticed is the ¿. That’s not a symbol used in Italian, but in Spanish.

    Otherwise nice article. Keep it up Alyssa!

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